Glossary

Abstract scenario: a scenario for which there is no concrete referent provided.

Account for: provide reasons for (something).

Give an account of: report or describe an event or experience.

Taking into account: considering other information or aspects.

Verbal and non-verbal behaviour used to promote accurate listening.

A word class that may modify a verb (for example, ‘beautifully’ in ‘She sings beautifully’), an adjective (for example ‘really’ in ‘He is really interesting’) or another adverb (for example ‘very’ in ‘She walks very slowly’). In English many adverbs have an –ly ending.

A sense of beauty or an appreciation of artistic expression.

Consider in detail for the purpose of finding meaning or relationships, and identifying patterns, similarities and differences.

Anaphoric reference: when a word in a text refers back to other ideas in the text for its meaning, for example ‘I saw Jim. He is well.’

Cataphoric reference: When a word refers to ideas later in the text, for example ‘It is amazing! This car is the best new deal around!’

Use, utilise or employ in a particular situation.

How attitudes are expressed in texts; that is, interpersonal meanings which convey an author's evaluation of something or someone and which help to position the audience.

The act of discerning quality and value of literary texts.

Determine the value, significance or extent of (something).

A way of thinking about a situation/idea/character. For example, an author or audience may be subjective, supportive or antagonistic towards something or someone.

The group of readers, listeners or viewers that the writer, designer, filmmaker or speaker is addressing. Audience includes students in the classroom, an individual, the wider community, review writers, critics and the implied audience.

The composer or originator of a work (for example, a novel, film, website, speech, essay, autobiography).

The composer or originator of a work (for example, a novel, film, website, speech, essay, autobiography).