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Context statement

The place of the Korean culture and language in Australia and the world
Korean is the language of one of Australia’s important neighbours in the Asian region and is spoken by around 80 million people in the Korean Peninsula and worldwide.

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PDF documents

Resources and support materials for the Australian Curriculum: Languages - Korean are available as PDF documents. 
Languages - Korean: Sequence of content
Languages - Korean: Sequence of Achievement - F-10 Sequence
Languages - Korean: Sequence …

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Years 3 and 4

Years 3 and 4 Band Description

The nature of the learners

At this level, children are developing awareness of their social world and membership of various groups, including of the Korean class. They have developed initial literacy in English and this helps to some degree in learning Korean. They benefit from varied, activity-based learning that builds on their interests and capabilities and makes connections with other areas of learning.

Korean language learning and use

Learners interact with peers and the teacher in classroom routines and a variety of classroom activities. They build oral proficiency with provision of rich language input and ample opportunities to rehearse modelled language in communicative activities where grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation are purposefully integrated. They develop understanding of the alphabetic nature of Hangeul and read words that consist of syllable blocks with 받침. They exchange simple information, feelings and ideas related to their personal worlds, finding commonalities and acknowledging differences between each other. The language they use and hear is in simple structures and with familiar vocabulary. They follow instructions, respond to questions and read and create short texts on topics relevant to their interests and enjoyment such as family, pets or favourite sports or food, and those drawn from other learning areas. They explore ideas and values important to Korean culture through shared tasks such as shared reading of Korean folktales. The language used in routine activities is re-used from lesson to lesson in different situations, making connections between what has been learnt and what is to be learnt.

Contexts of interaction

The primary context of interaction in Korean is the classroom, where Korean is used as much as possible. Learners have access to resources and authentic texts in Korean via virtual and digital technology and are encouraged to share their learning at home where possible. They experience authentic Korean language and culture through community activities, for example, with Korean-speaking neighbours or at Korean festivals.

Texts and resources

Learners engage primarily with a variety of teacher-generated materials, stories, games and songs, and with materials produced for young learners of Korean such as interactive computer language games, cards and readers. They may also have access to materials developed for children in Korea, such as television programs, advertisements or web pages, as a means of developing cultural awareness and language experience.

Features of Korean language use

Learners are increasingly aware that the Korean language is used not only in Korea and in the Korean community in Australia, but also in many other places around the world. They make connections and comparisons, and look for differences and similarities between Korean and English. They begin to make connections between speech and writing in Korean and understand that Korean is a system that works differently from English. They differentiate sounds of Hangeul syllable blocks, and their literacy in Hangeul develops with a growing phonological awareness and understanding of Hangeul as an alphabetic system. They notice features of key grammatical forms and structures that they use as part of formulaic or set phrases, and understand that such phrases are required elements in Korean sentences in order to make sense. They are increasingly aware that a verb comes at the end of a Korean sentence and use basic common action and descriptive verbs with the informal polite ending –어/아요 and its honorific form –(으)세요 as appropriate. They create short texts using familiar words relating to their expanding interests and basic grammatical forms and structures. They develop understanding that the same word may be used in different meanings according to the context. Through continuous use of Korean with culturally appropriate gestures and body language, they become increasingly aware of the interdependency of language and culture, and begin to establish their identity as a learner of Korean, mediating between Korean language and culture and the familiar world of their own, exploring and comparing cultural norms embedded in everyday interactions in Korean and in their own language/s.

Level of support

The primary support for learners is the teacher of Korean, who gives instruction, explanation, examples, models, reinforcement, encouragement and feedback. Form-focused instructions are integrated into task-based activities for grammar and vocabulary learning. Support also includes material resources such as word lists, pictures, Hangeul charts, realia and multimedia resources.

The role of English

Learners use Korean for classroom routines, familiar interactions, and structured learning tasks and for listening to and viewing Korean texts. English is used where appropriate for instruction, explanation and discussion, while learners may move between Korean and English, for example, when they discuss or compare aspects of Korean and English language and culture, or when they create bilingual texts.


Years 3 and 4 Content Descriptions

Socialising

Socialise and build relationships with peers and teacher through the exchange of personal information in relation to self, friends and family members

[Key concepts: friendship, occasions, celebration; Key processes: expressing, sharing] (ACLKOC134 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • asking and answering questions relating to personal information about themselves,each other, friends, family members, favourite things and special talents, for example, 누구예요? 몇 살이에요?
  • interacting with each other, for example, by using 나/저도 좋아요; 아, 그래요? as set phrases in action-related exchanges and shared activities such as games, including interactive computer games, role-plays and composing chants/rhymes
  • exchanging simple correspondence such as notes,invitation or birthday cards in print or digital form
Participate in collaborative tasks and shared experiences such as creating and playing simple language games or dialogues that involve simple negotiation, or preparing and presenting a group display

[Key concepts: participation, cooperation; Key processes: problem-solving, contributing] (ACLKOC135 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • asking and responding to questions in group activities such as number games, for example, using 몇이에요? and … 이에요/예요, for example, 삼이에요 to form a group with those who have the same number card
  • negotiating requests using simple Korean expressions, for example, 지우개 있어요?; 아니요, 없어요; 빌려 주세요; 네, 여기 있어요
  • preparing, rehearsing and carrying out presentations,such as a Korean item for school assembly, or a digital presentation about a significant cultural event or celebration, for example, Taegeukgi, taekwondo
Participate in everyday classroom activities such as responding to teacher’s instructions, attracting attention and asking for repetition

[Key concepts: instructions, respect; Key processes: interacting, expressing] (ACLKOC136 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • getting a turn to ask a question, for example, 질문 있어요
  • requesting repetition, for example, 다시 해 주세요
  • following instructions given in Korean, for example, 해 보세요, 들으세요, 쓰세요, 말하세요, 읽으세요
  • answering teacher’s questions, 이게/저게/그게 뭐예요? (given as a set phrase), in a short Korean sentence as a set phrase, for example, 그게/그건 책상이에요
  • praising or complimenting each other, for example, (아주) 잘했어요

Informing

Identify topics and key points of factual information in short spoken, written, digital and multimodal texts related to familiar contexts, routines and interests

[Key concepts: routines, pastimes; Key processes: selecting, categorising, recording] (ACLKOC137 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • gathering information about other people’s activities, for example by surveying peers about weekend or dailyactivities, for example, 주말에 뭐 해요? 수영해요; 오늘 뭐 해요? 학교에 가요
  • compiling information and reporting it to others, forexample, by making a shared class graph showing popular leisure activities
  • listening to short spoken texts with some unfamiliar language, identifying points of information, for example, the name and number on a recorded phone message, the age of a child interviewed
  • obtaining and using factual information from print, digital or multimodal texts related to other learning areas, for example, completing a simple science experiment, naming countries and significant land features, or recording distances using geography skills
Present information gathered from different types of texts relating to people, objects, places and events

[Key concepts: home, school, information; Key processes: organising, informing, presenting] (ACLKOC138 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • reporting on information gathered from sources including online resources such as interviews, surveys or brochures, using different media including those in digital formats such as drawings, posters and captioned photos
  • using simple descriptive language and supporting resourcesto introduce family members and friends, identifying relationships (우리 엄마예요; 친구예요) and cultural backgrounds (호주 사람이에요;한국 사람이에요)
  • creating a class profile from information collected from each other, for example, creating a chart or database to identify favourite sports, food, or colours (크리켓, 불고기,빨간색)
  • presenting information on events or topics of possible interest to Korean children of their own age (for example, 생일, 방학), using multimodal resources and realia support and building vocabulary to describe actions and feelings

Creating

Participate in and reflect on imaginative experiences such as digital interactive stories or video clips, identifying characters, main ideas and events, and sharing feelings or ideas by acting out responses or expressing preferences or opinions

[Key concepts: character, plot; Key processes: shared reading, performing, recounting] (ACLKOC139 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • listening to, viewing and reading text in different formats, including digital texts such as video clips, paintings and stories, for example, Korean traditional tales (해님달님, 흥부와 놀부)
  • participating in shared reading and responding to questions about characters, ideas and events, for example, by illustrating and captioning aspects of the texts
  • playing mime games using characters from imaginative stories experienced
  • sharing imaginative experiences in short statements about aspects such as characters, settings or events (흥부가 착해요)
  • using movement or actions to reinforce meaning in texts such as television programs, songs or games
Create and perform simple imaginative and expressive spoken and written texts such as dialogues or collaborative stories, using formulaic expressions and modelled language

[Key concepts: imagination, humour; Key processes: presenting, composing] (ACLKOC140 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • composing, modifying and completing own versions of skits, chants and songs, with teacher’s guidance and scaffolding, and the stimulus of different imaginative texts and experiences
  • creating individual texts such as comics, diary entries and short stories, using modelled language to express own ideas and imagined experience
  • producing and presenting picture/digital books or short scripted plays or animations that use favourite Korean words and expressions
  • creating and performing alternative versions of stories or action songs, using voice, rhythm and gestures to animate characters, or using drawings or story maps to create visual context

Translating

Translate simple Korean words and expressions for peers, teachers and family, noticing how they have similar or different meanings when translated to English or other languages

[Key concepts: specificity, commonality, meaning; Key processes: explaining, comparing] (ACLKOC141 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • noticing different aspects of Korean and English language and culture, such as naming conventions (for example, 박준호 versus ‘JohnSmith’) and explaining differences such as order and spacing
  • noticing Korean in texts such as signage and labels, and producing their equivalents in English
  • translating Korean texts such as public signs to understand the gist, noticing how meaning changes when translated into English, as in the case of expressions of politeness
  • identifying words that change their meaning according to the context, for example, (home/house: 집에 가요, 우리 집이에요), or 있어요 (have … /there is (are) … :저는 지우개가 있어요; 제니 있어요?)
Create simple bilingual resources for their learning and for the school community

[Key concepts: similarity, difference; Key processes: selecting, relating, describing] (ACLKOC142 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • producing a parallel bilingual word list by identifying known Korean words or expressions and relating them to English equivalents, and vice versa, noticing that direct translation sometimes does not work
  • preparing descriptions in both Korean and English about familiar topics, using modelled language and choosing vocabulary from word lists, discussing differences in expression between the two languages with the teacher
  • creating bilingual texts for the classroom and the school community using digital technologies (for example, posters, songs and online newsletter items), sharing ideas about how to represent meaning in different languages for different audiences

Reflecting

Share own experiences of communicating and using language/s, noticing how these are influenced by their own culture/s

[Key concepts: open-mindedness, politeness; Key processes: experimenting, reflecting, connecting] (ACLKOC143 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures
  • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
  • reflecting on different ways of naming, greeting and addressing someone (for example, by first name or title, including (non-)use of honorifics and aspects of body language such as eye contact) and on the issue of appropriateness in both Korean and Australian cultures
  • reflecting on each others’ ways of communicating and their appropriateness in Korean or non-Korean contexts, for example, using 언니/누나 and 오빠/형 for older siblings in Korean versus using their first names in English as terms of address
  • sharing ideas about how some Australian terms and expressions might be understood from a Korean perspective, for example, ‘bushwalking’, ‘kick a footy’ or ‘lamington’
Associate themselves with wider networks such as clubs, countries or language-speaking communities, and reflect on how being a Korean language user broadens these networks

[Key concepts: membership, profile; Key processes: describing, identifying] (ACLKOC144 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • identifying various groups they belong to and reflecting on themselves as members of multiple groups
  • appreciating their additional identity as a learner of the Korean language and culture and their expanded role in their own network
  • creating own profile using spoken, written or digital forms of expression to identify roles in or memberships of various groups, including their identity as a person knowing more than one language
  • describing themselves as members of various groups by profiling themselves with drawings of their friends, family, class and school, naming them using 친구, 우리 가족, 우리 반 and 우리 학교

Systems of language

Recognise characteristics of Korean pronunciation and intonation patterns, the alphabetical nature of Hangeul, and the structural features of individual syllable blocks including 받침

[Key concepts: sound discrimination, word recognition, syllable, syllable block, 받침, alphabetic system; Key processes: recognising, exploring, experimenting, relating] (ACLKOU145 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • learning sets of Korean vowels and consonants
  • discriminating between sounds in Korean, for example, 가/카/까; 다/타/따; 바/빠/파; 사/싸; 자/차/짜; 내/네; 너/노
  • experimenting with Hangeul consonants and vowels to construct/deconstruct syllable blocks, for example, ㅊ + ㅏ ◊ 차; ㄱ + ㅏ + ㅇ ◊ 강; ㅅ+ ㅜ ◊ 수; ㄱ + ㅗ + ㅁ ◊ 곰
  • identifying how pronunciation and intonation are used in spoken, written and multimodal texts, for example, 좋아요; 아주 좋아요; 좋아요?
Understand and use key grammatical forms and structures such as basic pronouns and case markers and the polite verb ending –어/아요 in own simple language production, and recognise politeness embedded in humble or honorific forms such as and –(으)세요

[Key concepts: grammar, sentence; Key processes: sequencing, relating, predicting] (ACLKOU146 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • constructing sentences with an –어/아요 ending on topics of personal interest in simple structures with support such as scaffolding, modelling or cues and in meaningful contexts, for example, 저는 사과를 먹어요
  • using –(으)세요 for different types of sentences (such as statements, questions, requests or commands) and recognising the honorific meaning embedded in −세−
  • using and to refer to self and understanding different contexts where they are used
  • using a structure, a noun or pronoun + a case marker/particle (–은/는, –이/가, –을/를, –에, –도) as a set phrase, for example, 저는, and understanding differences in meanings
  • understanding that 이게, 저게 and 그게 refer to objects without naming and that they are subjects in sentences, for example, 이게 뭐예요?
  • asking simple questions about a person, object or number using abasic question word such as 누구/누가, 무엇/뭐 or , for example, 지금 뭐 해요? 누구예요?
Recognise and use vocabulary to describe familiar people, objects and places, and basic routines, including Sino- and pure Korean number words with basic counters, words for colours, names of sports

[Key concepts: meaning, function, objects, people, number systems, action, state, quality; Key processes: identifying, naming, describing, qualifying] (ACLKOU147 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • using number expressions with appropriate counters, for example, 한 개, 두 마리, 세 명, 아홉 살, 삼학년
  • using basic common action and descriptive verbs to describe their daily lives or preferences, for example, 가요, 일어나요, 들어요, 해요, 좋아요, 나빠요, 착해요
  • using vocabulary related to school (for example, 학교, 책, 지우개, 친구), home (for example, 집,가족, 엄마, 아빠), sports and leisure activities (for example, 방학, 수영, 캠핑)
  • using vocabulary to describe familiar objects or people, for example, 빨간색 가방
  • using some adverbs as part of formulaic language, for example, 지금/오늘/주말에 뭐 해요? 아주 잘 했어요
Recognise differences in language features and text structures in different types of texts, including those in digital form, used in familiar contexts

[Key concepts: language features, mode, purpose; Key processes: observing patterns, distinguishing] (ACLKOU148 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • identifying familiar text types in different modes and using them in activities such as converting dialogues to chants
  • recognising language features typically associated with particular texts, for example, the use of imperatives in games
  • noticing differences between written and spoken texts (for example, comparing a written story with a spoken version), or comparing how texts within the same mode can differ, for example, a birthday card and an email message

Language variation and change

Build understanding of the variability of language use in Korean, for example, in relation to the age and relationship of participants

[Key concepts: relationships, age; Key processes: identifying, routinising] (ACLKOU149 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • greeting and taking part appropriately in familiar situations, for example, with peers and with the teacher, identifying differences of contexts and addressees, for example, 안녕?; 안녕하세요?; 안녕히 가세요/계세요; 잘 가/있어
  • recognising the appropriateness of gestures to accompany language when addressing teachers, friends or visitors to school
Understand that languages change over time and influence each other through contact and cultural exchanges

[Key concepts: language change, influence; Key processes: observing, identifying, discussing] (ACLKOU150 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
  • viewing images of the original version of 훈민정음 and recognising that some letters in the original are not used in modern Korean, for example, •, ᅙ, ᅀ
  • reflecting on and discussing which languages Korean might have influenced and might have been influenced by over time, for example, Chinese, Japanese, English, French and Italian
    • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
Reflect on and share their experience when using Korean and when using own language/s, recognising cultural elements that may cause different feelings

[Key concepts: culture, identity, attitudes; Key processes: identifying, comparing, reflecting] (ACLKOU151 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • reflecting on contexts where cultural elements are embedded in language use in Korean (for example, bowing when saying 안녕하세요?) and comparing this with equivalent contexts and ways of using language in English
  • recognising that 우리 means ‘my’ when used with certain words, for example, 우리 가족, 우리 나라, and sharing their ideas/experience about such use

Role of language and culture

Compare and reflect on different ways of using language in everyday situations in Korean, Australian and other cultures, sharing ideas about possible reasons for the differences and variations

[Key concepts: difference, expression, importance; Key processes: identifying, distinguishing, connecting] (ACLKOU152 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Ethical Understanding
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • recognising the importance of politeness explicitly expressed in Korean and comparing this with English, for example, 만나서 반가워요 versus ‘Nice to meet you’
  • understanding that language carries information about the people who use it and that common expressions often reflect cultural values important to that language community
  • reflecting on individual words which may be interpreted differently by people who do not know Korean culture, for example, 우리 집, 우리 선생님
  • identifying non-verbal expressions that are typical or expected in communication in different cultures, for example, eye contact, bowing, nodding, pointing

Years 3 and 4 Achievement Standards

By the end of Year 4, students use Korean to interact in classroom routines, action-related talk and play with teachers and peers. They exchange personal information relating to aspects such as age or interests, using simple questions and short statements as set phrases (for example, 몇 살이에요? 아홉 살이에요; ...이/가 좋아요? 네, 좋아요). They use formulaic language to express rapport with others (for example, 아, 그래요? 나도 좋아요). Students respond to instructions for familiar classroom routines and activities taking required actions (for example, 해 보세요, 들으세요, 읽으세요) and to simple questions (for example, 이게 뭐예요? 누구예요? 몇이에요? 오늘 뭐 해요?) with set phrases ending in –이에요/예요 or -어/아요 (for example, 책상이에요; 벤이에요; 구예요; 학교에 가요). They ask for repetition (for example, 다시 해 주세요) and for a turn to ask a question (for example, 질문 있어요) and negotiate requests using simple language (for example, … 있어요?; 네, 있어요/아니요, 없어요; 빌려 주세요; 여기 있어요). Students identify key words or topics from simple oral, visual and written texts, using cues such as context, graphics, familiar vocabulary and language features to support understanding. They present simple information in texts in different formats and create and perform their own texts with the support of modelled language and other resources. Students approximate the sounds, rhythms and intonations of spoken Korean and write familiar words in Hangeul with some accuracy. They create simple sentences in their speech and writing, using basic case markers (such as –은/는, –이/가, –을/를, –에) and a particle –도 as an inseparable part of a formulaic structure: a noun/pronoun + a case marker/particle (for example, 저는 …, 집에 …, 나도 …). They use common action verbs and descriptive verbs (such as 가다, 일어나다, 듣다, 좋다) as part of formulaic expressions ending in –어/아요 or its honorific form –(으)세요, varying intonation contours for statements, questions (with or without a question word), requests or commands. They ask simple questions about people, objects or numbers, using question words such as 누구/누가, 무엇/뭐 and . They use contractions of demonstrative pronouns and –이 (for example, 이게, 저게 and 그게), as formulaic chunks, and vocabulary related to school (such as 학교, 책, 지우개), home (such as 집, 엄마, 아빠) and sports and leisure activities (such as 방학, 수영, 크리켓). They use vocabulary for major colours (such as 빨간색, 파란색, …) and number expressions, choosing between native Korean and Sino-Korean number systems up to 10 as appropriate, using counters to describe ages (for example, 아홉 살), school years (for example, 사 학년) and numbers of objects (for example, 한 개), animals (for example, 두 마리) or people (for example, 세 명). Students match known Korean words or expressions with their English equivalents and create simple bilingual texts of familiar objects with support. They understand that meaning may change through translation across languages and exemplify words that could be translated differently according to context (such as : house/home; … 있어요: I have …/there is (are) …). They identify different social networks they belong to such as clubs or language-speaking communities and compare their past and current intercultural capability with reference to the experience of learning Korean.

Students discriminate between meaningful sounds in Korean which are not distinguished in English or other languages such as // versus // versus // or // versus //, and associate the pronunciation of simple words with their script. Students differentiate statements from questions according to intonation. They identify simple consonant and vowel letters in Hangeul and combine them to construct a syllable block. They create short texts using syllable blocks combined together to form a word. They apply their understanding of Korean and English having different grammatical systems by using appropriate word order (subject-object-verb) and case–marked formulaic chunks (for example, 저는, 사과를) in simple Korean sentences. They identify differences between Korean and English in some aspects of language use such as naming conventions or ways of addressing people. They apply their understanding of the importance of politeness in using Korean and select the appropriate form of language to acknowledge age and social relationships when greeting (for example, 안녕? versus 안녕하세요?; 안녕히 가세요/안녕히 계세요 versus 잘 가/잘 있어). They identify aspects of language use in both Korean and English that people from other cultures might or might not regard as appropriate, such as ways of greeting or (not) making eye contact during interactions.


Years 3 and 4 Work Sample Portfolios